Rose Petal and Crushed Raspberry Lemonade

Rose Petal and Crushed Raspberry Lemonade - From My Dining Table

Rose Petal and Crushed Raspberry Lemonade - From My Dining Table

This could be a tale of a faraway and exotic land. The story of how once I travelled across the seas from London to the Syrian desert - of how we strolled through the ruins of Palmyra; of how the soles of our feet pounded the ancient flagstones of Apamea; and we perched on the walls of Crac de Chevalier; of how we bought saffron and gold in the market at Aleppo. To think that only shadows of these places – places so steeped in spellbinding history – now survive, adds to the pathos of that tale. 

In Damascus I bought a pound of dried rosebuds. They came wrapped in crinkly white paper and travelled in my handbag, through Heathrow customs, all the way back to South London. There I stored them in a jar on my kitchen shelf. For months. Then years. Eventually I binned the lot. Somehow too precious to cook with, they never made it to being more than a dusty reminder of a holiday. 

Had I steeped the pretty pink rosebuds in water and sugar to make a syrup, a delicate ambrosia to sweeten freshly pressed lemonade on hot summers’ days, I could have told you a tale of Syrian roses and romance. But I didn’t. C’est la vie.

Rose Petal and Crushed Raspberry Lemonade - From My Dining Table

 

Rose Petal and Crushed Raspberry Lemonade - From My Dining Table

The fact is that holiday souvenirs don’t travel well. It’s as if the magic is rubbed off them in transit. Sangria tastes best on holiday in Spain, drunk late at night in a crowded bar. Straw baskets look chic in the souks of Marrakech – bring them back to the city and they suddenly seem tacky. 

So instead, I give you the story of an English rose. And that’s a good story too. No adventure. No Laurence of Arabia romance. But lots of chocolate box and thatched cottage charm. The English rose does that so well. This year, Summer has come early to London: glorious, precious sunshine drenching the streets. It won’t last long. But while it does – flowers bloom across the city, and front gardens are filled with bushes that literally groan under the weight of overblown gothic roses. 

So this isn’t a Syrian Rose lemonade. It’s an English summer drink. Made with fresh raspberries from the counties, lightly crushed so that they run ruby red juices. And a dash of scented rosewater. Garden rose petals frozen into ice cubes. And freshly pressed sharp lemon juice. It’s a drink of now. Of today. And of the comforting beauty of home.

Rose Petal and Crushed Raspberry Lemonade - From My Dining Table

Rose Petal and Crushed Raspberry Lemonade - From My Dining Table

Rose Petal and Crushed Raspberry Lemonade
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
5 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
5 min
Ingredients
  1. FOR THE SYRUP
  2. 100g caster sugar
  3. 100ml water
  4. 50g raspberries
  5. 1/3 tsp rosewater
  6. FOR THE LEMONADE
  7. 4 lemons
  8. 800ml water
Instructions
  1. To make the syrup, pour the sugar, water and raspberries into a small saucepan and set over a medium heat. Leave to simmer gently for five minutes or so, stirring occasionally until the sugar is dissolved and the colour of the raspberries has begun to seep into the syrup. Add the rosewater and stir again. Use a sieve to strain the syrup and throw out the fruit pulp. Set to one side - the syrup will keep for days in the fridge.
  2. Halve the lemons and squeeze the juice into a jug, then top with cold water, stir vigorously and add rose sugar syrup to taste. Serve over ice.
From My Dining Table by Skye McAlpine http://www.frommydiningtable.com/
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Comments

  1. Maureen Irvine says

    Oooh Skye! Shades of Damask Rose, how very exotic and yet so English! Hope we get the Summer such a drink deserves.
    Maureen

    • Skye says

      Thank you, Olaiya! You’re so sweet. Hope that you enjoy the lemonade… Have just been to check out your site and LOVE the photos that you’ve got on there – are they all post Portugal? Xx

  2. says

    Precious souvenirs do have a way fading away don’t they? Though the story of Syrian roses is swooning and your writing is always inviting to cozy up with a drink while reading :)

    • Skye says

      Can’t put my finger on what it is, but they do just fade away… It’s uncanny…
      Thank you for your lovely words, Gintare – so glad that you enjoy reading my ramblings… Xx

    • Skye says

      Thanks, Lilli! Hope that you like them… And make sure to please let me know how they turn out…

  3. says

    So beautiful – I love the delicate rose flavour here. I have a similar collection of holiday souvenirs that I just can’t bring myself to use but this makes me think that I probably should. That said, there’s something quite magical about an English rose too.

    • Skye says

      Yes, yes, yes – make good use of them now! Definitely learn by my mistakes… XX
      PS English roses: completely magical.

    • Skye says

      Oh what a happy thought! Yes, this is definitely a girly lemonade… Will you let me know how she likes it? Xx

  4. says

    Skye, I always feel as if I’m settling down with a good novel when I read one of your posts. They are always so beautiful. I totally agree that holiday souvenirs, food or not, usually lose their lustre once you get back home (I think I wrote a sentence to that effect in one of my last posts but edited it out just before I published!)
    How lovely it would be to be served a glass of this lemonade on a sunny afternoon. I have a Pinterest board especially for beautiful drinks like this and it’s going on it right now!

    • Skye says

      Helen, you always leave the loveliest comments – thank you! And I’m honoured to have my pink lemonade pinned on your beautifully curated board… XX
      PS Foodie minds think alike – love it.

    • Skye says

      A kindred spirit! I love lemonade too – I had some recently with fresh sage and ginger syrup whig was delightful… am going to try making it soon…

    • Skye says

      Ha, that makes me feel so much better, Jenny. Glad to hear that I’m not the only one… And thank you for your sweet words! Xx

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