Baby New Potato Salad with Fresh Parsley, Lemon and Samphire

New Potato, Lemon and Samphire Salad - From My Dining Table

June 20th is the summer solstice. That means the sun poised at the highest point of the sky, and the longest day of the year: but is it also a harbinger of impending autumn? Are we going glass half full with this one? Or half empty? I’m a half glass full kind of a person. I’ll lay all my cards on the table now. So yes, technically speaking, the longest day of the year means that as of June 20th the days are only going to get shorter. I’ll give you that one. I won’t even try to fight it. But I’ll also tell you that between me and my heavy winter boots stand the Wimbledon season, some beach time on the Venice Lido, white peaches and a hell of a lot of gelato. Fact.

New Potato, Lemon and Samphire Salad - From My Dining Table

New Potato, Lemon and Samphire Salad - From My Dining Table

Right now, today: it’s all about the  bunch of peonies perched on our piano, the dawn chorus waking me up in the mornings, and the garden strawberries. And the clotted cream – not technically seasonal fare, but oh so very good with the strawberries. Today, it feels like full blown, deep summer. With the whisper of more to come. Glass very much half full. Frankly – glass outright brimming. With metaphorical Pimms and lemonade.

Round about this time of year, Midsummer, I inevitably find myself having  a ‘new potato’ moment. It happens every year. Baby potatoes, served cold – with lashings of good olive oil and fresh herbs - and guised as a salad. Though anyone who lived through the Atkins mania of the Noughties knows better than to speak of carbs and salad in the same sentence without inverted comments loaded with irony. The potato salad – you see – is to summer what the roast potato is to winter. If you are the kind of person who forgoes seconds of Christmas turkey, only to nibble on the really crispy bits of potato that you’ve surreptitiously scraped off the bottom of the pan – and, let’s be clear, I am that kind of a person – then, you too are probably having a new potato moment right now. And you will want – let’s rephrase that, you will need - a potato salad at your summer picnic. At your summer barbecue. At your summer pretty much anything loosely involving food. Along with your asparagus tart and your strawberry and mascarpone galette. I’m just saying.

New Potato, Lemon and Samphire Salad - From My Dining Table

New Potato, Lemon and Samphire Salad - From My Dining Table

Therein, of course, lies the tricky question of how to cook and dress these baby potatoes. Some subscribe to the mayonnaise school of thought – a sort of creamy sauce with chopped chives. But I like to go for something a little lighter  - and it was in the quest for a delicate dish that this recipe came about. I was in the kitchen, playing with samphire. Very small pun intended – couldn’t resist. Seeing what I could make with this seasonal delicacy. Turns out that the samphire salty sea green perfectly compliments the earthy new potato. Match made in heaven. I heaped in a pile of roughly chopped, verdant parsley – for good measure. And sliced up a lemon. The lemon cooks ever so slightly as you toss it with the piping hot potatoes, its zest and rind tenderise and the juices make for a delicate vinaigrette. All in all - irresistible.

New Potato, Lemon and Samphire Salad - From My Dining Table

New Potato, Lemon and Samphire Salad - From My Dining Table

To me this salad says Midsummer. It says long days, short nights. It says Ray-Ban sunglasses, a vintage cotton dress and the patter of the tiniest red suede moccasins. But that’s just me. I like potatoes and I’m a full glass kind of a person. How about you?

 

Baby New Potato Salad with Parsley, Lemon and Samphire
Serves 4
Print
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
25 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
25 min
Ingredients
  1. 1kg baby new potatoes
  2. 70ml olive oil
  3. large bunch of fresh parsley generous pinch of Maldon salt
  4. 90g samphire
  5. 1 lemon
Instructions
  1. Steam the potatoes for 20-25 mins, depending on size, until they are tender if you pierce them with a fork. When cooked, toss them in a large boil, drizzle generously with the oil and sprinkle with salt. Toss well so that all the potatoes are coated. You want to make sure to do this while they are still warm so that they absorb all the flavour of the oil and seasoning. Roughly chop the parsley and add to the mix. Slice them lemon as thinly as you can and add to the salad. Meanwhile, steam the samphire for 4-6 mins until tender, but not wilted, and add to the potatoes. Serve warm or at room temperature.
From My Dining Table by Skye McAlpine http://www.frommydiningtable.com/
 

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Comments

  1. says

    Here in Scandinavia, new potatoes are probably the most praised ingredient. Preferably, you buy them at the farmers’ market directly from the farmer him/herself who has harvested them earlier in the morning. You go home, cook them, and serve them with a knob of butter, fresh dill, and, if you wish, pickled herring. Hands down, one of my top 10 favorite flavor combos. Can’t to have my first local new potatoes in just a few weeks! Actually, traditionally the first local new potatoes are enjoyed on Midsummer!

    Your potato salad looks wonderful, Skye. Will definitely give it a go.

    • Skye says

      What a great story! Thanks for sharing, Sini. Will there be photos of your Midsummer feast on your lovely Instagram feed? Please say yes! Xx

  2. says

    I’m afraid my natural self is more of a glass empty kind of person, but I try to catch myself being like that and turn things around to ‘glass full’.
    This is a great reminder not to miss out on this season’s new potatoes, Skye! And served like this they sound divine, especially with the added lemon. Thanks for the introduction to samphire, too, which I had never heard of!

    • Skye says

      Oh yes, definitely try the samphire – it’s one of my favourites. I’s great with fish and I like it in pasta too – with wholemeal spaghetti and chopped cherry tomatoes… Heavenly. Xx

  3. says

    I like potatoes too and also prefer a light vinaigrette to a mayonnaise, using lemon or a dash of verjuice. Your recipe sounds lovely.

    Potato salad holds a warm place in my heart. It brings me back to the picnic my partner organised for us one autumn day and the proposal which came after we’d eaten among other things, his homemade potato salad.

    • Skye says

      Krys, that is such a romantic story. I love how simple foods can evoke such feelings of nostalgia and happiness! Xx

    • Skye says

      Thanks, Kate. I’m a big big big samphire fan – I also like it in pasta and, obviously, with fish. Although, I’m sure that you could come up with a creative way of eating it in cake form… which I would love to try… Xx

  4. says

    Your photos are just so beautiful! The potato salad looks delicious, and it is so refreshing to have an option that is a bit special but not completely doused in mayonnaise.

    • Skye says

      Awww, thanks, Jenny. Yes, I’m not a big fan of mayonnaise-y potatoes. Unless, of course, it’s homemade mayonnaise – and even then, I find it a bit heavy…

    • Skye says

      Peonies are some of my favourite flowers. They’re just magical at this time of year.
      And I’ve just discovered the joys of lemon with potatoes – such a great flavour combination. Xx

  5. Terry says

    The odyssey of trying to find Samphire in the Black Forest has begun.

    I have some leftover jus (bay leaves, oranges, garlic, and lardo) from making carnitas that I plan to use as a base for a pork loin. I would like to serve that with your new potato salad and blanched green beans. There’s a bottle of Patrimo di Feudi di San Gregoria già pronto.

    Thanks for the fabulous idea for this salad.

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